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CCWA CURRENTS Feb. 2000
What follows is an edited version of our newsletter "CURRENTS".  To get the full printed version, just join the club using the membership form below, and get the complete newsletter delivered to your mailbox every month.  Send submissions to the newsletter to LooseClu@prodigy.net.

Commodore's Notes:  Hey!     by:  Chester Hulme 
OK everybody, we opted to return to the monthly pot luck meetings and we sure could have used some attendance at the January meeting. 
WHERE WERE YOU? 

I really need to see a lot of people at the meetings, so that I can be assured of having plenty of  food.  Please plan to attend.  If you have something you would like to discuss, let me know ahead of time. 

I would like to set a new goal for the club.  We have what I feel is a good mix of events.  We have the Whataburger race series in the Spring, fun sails including the Screaming Reach, Bird to Causeway, Goose Island Getaway, & the Aransas Triangle, and the Oso Series in the fall.  No other clubs host this many events. 

What I would like to see us focus on is improving sailing access in the area.  We have good access to the Bay.  We have a great site at Bird Island.  What we donít have is a great launch site on the mainland side of the Laguna Madre.  I would like everyone to put their thinking caps on and help figure out how to approach this problem.  We could look at approaching public (city and county) or private avenues.  I suggest that we form a committee to research possible sites ( who better than us to identify this) and put together a plan ( public awareness, fund-raisers, etc.) to accomplish it.  Any volunteers? 

Regrettably, it looks like we will have to cancel/reschedule the Tampico trip.  My niece is getting married (hope she is as lucky with her husband as Pam has been) on that weekend.  So, Pam and I will be unable to go.  Anyone interested in the trip let me know when you would like to see it and Iíll try to set things up with our compadres. 

See you on the water.     --   Chester
 

The Weather Leg Racing Primer  Chapter V   by   Guy R. 

 So you've come away from the Starting line in good shape, your gear is humming along, your fin is biting nicely, your rig is handling smoothly as it sucks you over the oncoming chop to windward.  What Now? 
     Over the years I have personally had the most trouble with my performance to weather.  This is where the smallest imbalance, the slightest tuning error,  or the least  gear choice mistake makes the most difference.   I always seem to FEEL that I can point higher than I am, and yet cranking the board a degree or two upwind almost always spoils the boatspeed and loses me ground. 
     "REAL" sailors speak of Velocity Made Good, or (VMG)  to describe the vector breakdown of your speed multiplied by some factor of the angle to windward of your course.   They can use compasses, knot meters, vector tables and telltales to sit and calculate this stuff as they sip their Courvoisier by the helm.    We windsurfers  just seek "The Groove".  Going fast always seems to oppose pointing high.  At the point where we find the best compromise between them lies The Groove. 
     The thing that ALWAYS seems to be a good guide to finding the groove is the feel I get from the fin.  If my foot pressure is  met by crisp, firm, tight response from the back of the board, that tells me the fin has plenty of lift, and is tracking smoothly and quickly to weather.  If the fin feels mushy, soft, and imprecise,  and the board is waffling upwind and downwind, never settling into a steady groove,then I need to ease up and let the board regain some speed before pushing upwind any more.  Remember too that larger chop means that you have to accept a little less angle due to the loss of contact with the water 
as well as the deceleration and low-lift situation you encounter after each landing.  Ease up, go faster and enjoy the "accidental air" you're sure to get while staying in the groove. 
     Turning your attention to the sail, it's important to try to get the rig "flying freely" while you hang on loosely underneath.  The sail on an efficient upwind course may actually seem to sheet out just a little and "suck you upwind".  You can LET the rig just kiss the leeward footstrap from time to time, but do not try to FORCE it there.  Forceful sheeting in to "close the gap" will NOT get you upwind faster, it will only slow your boatspeed and increase sideways drift.  Your nose may LOOK like it's pointing higher but you will not go where it is pointing, but instead slip sideways to a point much lower and slower than your APPARENT direction of travel. 
     To prove this to yourself, start from a known position (a trap marker or buoy) and sail towards shore at an angle as high as you can comfortably maintain.   Look for an object ashore straight ahead.  See if you actually can stay on that line for a while.  Next, crank the board up a couple of degrees and tighten up on the sail to maintain that angle relative to the wind.  As you hold position, look again at the object you thought you were headed for.  You may notice it gradually seems to move upwind relative to your direction of travel until it is impossible to reach on that tack. 
     Start over, but this time loosen up on the rig, let the board run freely and build up good boatspeed.   Allowing for inevitable variations in wind strength and direction, you'll probably  find over several trials that you get upwind best when you try the least! The only time I pinch nowadays is if it's the only way to save another pair of tacks over the last few 
yards before the weather mark.     Guy R.

Editor's Puffs:   by  Roy Tansill
Just in case you are depressed due to the winter weather weíve all gleefully endured the past month, Iíve selected a few letters from my e-mail inbox written by friends scattered about the hemisphere to cheer us up a bit.   The first one came from Sue Frank, sometimes instructor at WorldWinds, who for some obscure reason chooses to live on a mountain in Colorado. 
    Ď Hope you are doing well. We have had wind of up to 88 mph, and it has been snowing "sideways" for the last 4 days! Highway surfing has been the sport of the week, with several head on collisions,  even the snowplow drivers have been shooting the ditch pipelines around here!  Can't wait to travel to warmer places!Ď 
     The second message was sent by Gus Linssen who is spending his winter in tropical Costa Rica.
    ĎThe weather here is not at all what you would expect. It has been raining for seven weeks straight and because the altitude is 2000 ft it is not hot here either. With the rain it is in the 60's and 70's.  When the sun comes out it goes into the 80's.  We are often at cloud level here so it will be foggy then.   Hopefully the dry season will start soon. It is about a month later than normal already (thanks to the la Niña weather pattern). It is incredibly windy though. I sailed my 3.0 the last three days. Sometimes the entire lake is liquid smoke for hours. It is almost impossible to  go out then. Vicki finally went out for half an hour yesterday on the 3.0 Ďtotally down hauled.í 
Now, doesnít that chase your winter blues away?

Events As Family Affairs     by    Cliff Tudor 
I want to start out saying that this is going to be a GREAT year to attend windsurfing events. I have ordered warm weather and good wind for all events. I am now going to tell you why you need to get off the couch, load up the vehicle with all your toys as well as the FAMILY and come have the time of your life. Unlike many events of the past, the events below are MORE fun than ever before. Granted I love racing as much as anybody, but it can get stressful at times. So I propose we have FUN racing for all the people who want it, we have FREE clinics and instruction for all the people who want it. Bring your bikes, inline skates, kites, FAMILY. Why did you get into windsurfing in the first place? Was it for the speed, exhilaration, the body slams, catapults...maybe.. I have been windsurfing for 20 years now and the part I enjoy the most is meeting new windsurfers or sharing my passion of the sport with others. Please come out to meet and share your experiences with some of the most wonderful, colorful, funny people around. Quit worrying about how far it is to drive all the way there and back. Share a ride with someone. Quit worrying about your skill level not being good enough or that you don't have the right equipment. There is usually good demo equipment available which must be shared. There will be demo kayaks at the Gulf Coast Championship and TX State Championship.  I know we have a lot of events in a short period of time but you really don't have to spend much money at any one event. I would like it even if you just came out to watch or help with the event, for sure listen to the FREE clinics. I know I am rambling but I want you to come out. You will have a hard time reaching your sailing goals if you don't get out and participate.  Make this the year! 
    The Gulf Coast Championship (GFC) will have a pot luck dinner while the other events will be catered. If your not going to race you can buy meal tickets to eat. Please bring your guitar and best jokes for the camp fire immediately following the Saturday night meal. 
March 24-26  ABK CLINIC at WorldWindsí  Bird Island Basin launch site 
April 1-2, WINDSURFWOMEN.COM INSTRUCTIONAL FAIR at WorldWinds 
April 6-8, ABK CAMP at Lake Texana 
April 8-9, GULF COAST CHAMPIONSHIPS at Lake Texana-To be held at Brackenridge Plantation on beautiful Lake Texana (7 miles Southeast of Edna on State Highway 111).  This is to be much more than your normal race. This is the social event of the year for Houston. Camping is top notch. I do know that some people are renting travel trailers or motor homes to take advantage of the great water front property with full hook-ups. The tent camping is also very good. This lake is known for it's good coastal wind, yet is fresh water. There will be an ABK Camp going on concurrently (Thursday-Saturday). ABK will provide demos on Sunday with 2000 BIC and Neil Pryde products. If you are not familiar with this camp, there is no better instruction available. If you are ready to get good, this is how to do it. This camp is good for the windsurfing beginner all the way to the high speed wanna be. Saturday night will be a pot luck dinner get together. There will be plenty of racing, windsurfing, kayaks and kite demos. For more information, call Cliff or Charlie at WINDSURFING SPORTS (800) WHY-SAIL or cliff@windsurfer.com. Call the shop about camping arrangements. Brackenridge Plantation (361)-782-5249 or (361) 782-7145. ABK (415) 927-8835, e-mail them at: <info@abksports.com> 
TEXAS STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS (TSC) at Lake Whitney this is to be much more than your normal race, it is a festival. This is the sailing social  of the year for Dallas-Fort Worth. Camping is also top notch at the state park. Windsurfing and kayak reps will provide demos on both days with 2000 products. There will be Free windsurfing clinics going on both days for all levels of windsurfers. For more information, call Aris Tsamis at Mariner Sails phone: (800) 536-9463 
May 6-7, BLOWOUT 2000 at S. Padre Island This is shallow water racing at it's best. Held in the Laguna Madre off the Convention Center near the "flats". The town of S. Padre Island goes all out rolling out the red carpets for windsurfers. If you want an inexpensive vacation to take the whole family on, think South Padre.
RACING: There will be your usual racing classes: Sport 7.5m2 limit, unlimited, Masters, Men's, Women's as well as the new TECHNO 283 Fleet. The "TECHNO 283 " fleet is a spin-off of the "Tech 31" Formula 31 which is already being widely used across the world including the Caribbean races like the HI-HO. 

Whatzis Techno 31? 
    Its an attempt to revive one design competition in which you are restricted to using one board and three sails registered for the event.  The one board is Bicís Techno 283, the rigs are your choice of any three you have. Larger boards like the TECHNO can handle substantially larger sails for any given wind condition. Therefore, limiting to 3 sails is not a hindrance and will help to attract more competitors to this new class. The only limitations on the equipment should be those of the USWA guidelines and with respect to the limited number of rigs. There should be no limitations on the number or size of fins, or the kind of footstraps used. It is very difficult to police limitations like these and this opens the class to petty protests. In addition to this, a wider range of fins will help to negate weight differences between competitors and will likely help to improve the performance of the board in a broader range of conditions.  The top "TECHNO" Man, Woman, and Masters of the 3 race series (Dallas, Houston & South Padre) will be provided trips to the Islamorada Pro/AM - November, 2000 and TECHNO Champion jackets. 
TECHNO 283 Classes: Men, Masters 35+, Women, (possible Junior class in the future) 
TECHNO 283 Product to be provided: Adventure Sports and myself will make available 10 charter boards. The charter fee will be $50 for the event. The competitor would need to supply their own rigs and any additional fins. 

Guyís Going!    -AWIA news release
TEAM USA TO JOIN TRANS-ATLANTIC WINDSURF RACE 2000:
     Gilford, NH: A multicultural team of seven professional and amateur windsurfers will become America's entry in the Trans-Atlantic Windsurf Race2000 (TAWR 2000).  The first international ocean going competition of the new year, TAWR2000 is scheduled to begin in Algarve,  Portugal on March 18, 2000 and finish in Fortaleza, in the state of Ceara, Brazil, on April 6, 2000.  The course of the race will take sailors from Portugal, to Madeira, Tenerife (in the Canary Islands),  and Cabo Verde, off the African coast. It is expected that, on March 28,  sailors from eight national teams will race each 
other across the Atlantic, to Brazil. 
     The windsurfers' arrival, at the finish line, will kick off celebrations tied to the yearlong Brazilian festivities marking the 500th anniversary of the discovery of Brazil by the Portuguese.  The Brazilian and Portuguese governments are cosponsoring TAWR2000. 
     TeamUSA  It is incredibly exciting for TeamUSA to take part in an event which can be called 'The Paris-Dakar Rally of the Sea,'" says TeamUSA captain John Chao, 46.  "Not only is there the challenge of crossing the Atlantic on a windsurfer, but every team member will dare to windsurf where none have gone before.  As we set out for Brazil,  we are truly carrying on in the spirit of the original Portuguese explorers. And we're probably flying across the sea ten times faster than their wooden boats." 
     The multicultural American team has been chosen not only based on their windsurfing skills but also for their endurance and stamina to withstand the challenges and difficulties of this endeavor. "We are extremely fortunate to have an exceptional group of adventurers," says Chao, who was an Olympic windsurfer in 1984, the first year that windsurfing became an Olympic sport.  The publisher and editor of American Windsurfer Magazine, the largest windsurfing publication in the world, Chao will sail with the team and will be filling reports as correspondent at sea. 
     TeamUSA is made up of five men and one woman, Renata Fuzetti, 23, a pro windsurfer from Sao Paulo, Brazil, who is now living on Maui, considered to be the world's best site for professional windsurfing.  CCWA memberGuy Miller, 44, a software developer and windsurfer based in Austin, Texas, is an amateur sailor, who has competed in numerous windsurfing events around the world. 
(Miller's participation in the race is sponsored by his employer, Trilogy Software, Inc., of Austin, Texas.)  Brazilian Marco de Moraes, 36, who lives and works in Greenwich, Connecticut, is a dedicated amateur windsurfer who sails all year round in New England. DeMoraes, who is originally from Rio de Janeiro, is sponsored by his employer, the World Wrestling Federation.  American Monty Spindler, 43, one of the world's premier windsurfing sail designers and a semi-pro sailor, is based in Tarifa, Spain.  Spindler is the designer/owner of The Loft sails and will be sponsored by LAM Sails, the manufacturer for The Loft brand. Australian-born Brian Antel, 19, is an amateur windsurfer with professional aspirations. Antel lives in Charleston, South Carolina and is a full-time college student studying business communications. 
     Each team will live in a specially designed, 35-foot boat for the entire race.  Equipped with state-of-the-art satellite  navigation and safety equipment, the boat will follow each racer closely, as a back-up.  After each 250-mile leg, the team boats will rendezvous at a resupply vessel anchored at sea, for a day of refueling, rest, and debriefing.  Ship doctor Chris Reid will be stationed onboard the resupply vessel for the duration of the event. 
     TAWR2000 will be the first transoceanic windsurfing event to be televised, around the world, during the race.  SNTV, a joint venture of AP and TWI, will have camera crews, helicopters, and satellite facilities available for daily feeds to SNTV's headquarters in London,  where daily highlights will be edited and fed to SNTV's clients around the world. "In the USA, SNTV supplies CNN and ESPN," says SNTV editor David Howells, in London. 

Edís note: Congratulations and good luck Guy, and donít forget to pay your Ď00 CCWA dues before you go. 

The cartoon is on the cartoons page.

Bird's Eye View:
Wind Peaks
 Nov, Dec, '99, & Jan, '00 
ABK Clinic:
DATES:  March 24-26, 2000 
LOCATION:  Bird Island Basin, Corpus Christi 
COST:$240
HOST SHOP:   WorldWinds 
     A typical weekend with ABK begins with a brief introduction session.  Campers are then divided into small groups by ability level to maximize access to instructors and stress individual technique development and personal improvement. New sailors will learn the basics through lectures and on-water instruction to ensure the best educational foundation. Experienced sailors will learn advanced techniques tailored to their specific interests and needs, while continuing to perfect their on-water skills. For a full camp of 40 people there will be a minimum of 8 instructors on site.
     Each morning session starts with a lecture, followed by on-land simulator work and/or on-water demonstrations, and then on-water drills and sailing with the instructors. At mid-day, campers break for lunch.    After lunch, the afternoon lectures begin and individual group work continues. Lecture topics increase in sophistication as the camp progresses and are often tailored to the specific conditions of the day. Each group continues to specialize and refine techniques that fit the individual needs of the camper. 
     After a full day on the water, it's time for video analysis where campers can see themselves in action, laugh, and most importantly, learn from their mistakes. 
     For more information about the ABK Camps visit www.abksports.com,  email us at info@abksports.com or call (415) 927-8835.  For gear rental call: WorldWinds (800) 793-7471 or local  949-7472 . 

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Letters to the Editor...the initial appearance of:    CURRANTS
Race-ISM
   When I moved to Corpus last spring, the first newsletter I received had a letter defending the club from "former members," who said it was too race oriented. 
     The November newsletter contained RACING primers 1 & 2 (with more to come), the editorís letter about his conversion to RACING, a schedule of coming RACES, an article about the last RACE, and Vicki's admirable attempt to raise money for women RACERS. 
     According to one of the articles, if I donít start racing, Iíll turn into a bored, uninterested, skill-challenged, sailor.  Do I detect a little elitism? 
     Now in the latest issue, the Commodore complains about the lack of members, and inactive members. There has to be a solution to this problem. I think Iíll take my FREESTYLE board to its favorite playground (one of those chop riddled washing machine type areas) and ponder the situation. Iíll let you know if I come up with an answer. 
Tom Seymour 
Edís note:  Right racey stuff there Tom. 

On The Otherhand...
     I am pleased to see the coverage that the upcoming Women's Clinic is receiving in the CCWA newsletter.  As one of the guest racing instructors for the clinic, I look forward to helping other female sailors improve their skills while taking some of the mystery and perceived intimidation out of racing for them.  It is after all, like all sports, just for fun, and I would like to invite all area sailors to come out and participate. 
      I would like to take this opportunity to clarify an important point regarding what needs to be correctly specified as the PRO Women's Purse at the U.S. Open.  The U.S. Open has been since its inception a pro/am event, meaning that amateur and professional racers compete in separate divisions.  Racers who enter the amateur divisions do not compete for cash.  Instead, top amateur finishers generally receive trophies and/or in-kind prizes from windsurfing manufacturers.  Racers who enter the professional divisions compete for cash.   This is an important distinction.  In addition, in the professional division, a portion of the total cash purse is generally allocated to each class (i.e.: open men, masters, open women, etc.) based on the number of racers in that class.  Therefore, a class of 30 professional men will compete for a much larger prize purse than, say, a class of 6 professional women. 
      I think I can safely say that the U.S. Open has not seen the number of professional women entrants that its organizers might have hoped for in past years.  Indeed, there have been some years when no professional women have entered.  I do not think that this is the fault of the organizers, but rather, it is a reflection of the very small number of women nationally who pursue windsurfing as a vocation.  As someone who competes regularly in local, regional and national events, I am pleased to say that the U.S. Open regularly hosts an amateur women's fleet at or above the average number of entrants seen at other similar events.  (There are, of course, exceptions from time to time, based on each region's location, populace, and demographics.) 
      As an amateur racer, I always look forward to the opportunity to race and interact with professional windsurfers--I always come away a better sailor for having done so.  In fact, I began racing just to improve my overall sailing skills--and it worked.  For this reason, I feel it is important to try to attract more professional women to compete at the U.S. Open.  However, I think it is also important for us to encourage an increase in the number of amateur women competitors as well.  And don't forget, all you weekend warriors out there, I believe that women who participate in the clinic as "students" will 
receive discounted entry fees to the U.S. Open! (Contact Elaine Motl at EM Marketing at 361-985-1555 for details).   In support of increasing participation on both the professional and amateur levels, it is with pleasure that I have agreed to teach a racing workshop at the clinic on April 1-2, and I look forward to seeing many new and many familiar faces there. Men, bring your wives, and wives, bring your men.  There should be something for everyone! 
 Jennifer Racette  CC-111
 

WHATABURGER  2000   THE SERIES
Whataburger #1- Oleander Pt., Mar. 25...Be there and help out

Volunteers Wanted:  The club sponsored events, both races and fun events, need people to help out on and before the events.  This is particularly true for the U.S. Open.  Last year, the CCWA was a sponsor and had a booth at the Open; but we didn't have sufficient help to man the booth throughout the event.  We don't want that to happen again!  Similarly, other events suffered because of a lack of help.  How about volunteering your help this year?  Just phone an event coordinator and offer some help. 
Corpus Christi Windsurfing Association Membership Application

Name:______________________________________Phone: (       )______________

Family membership, list names of family members:_____________________________________

____________________________________E-mail Add:_________________________

Address:_______________________________________________________________

City:_________________________________State:_________________Zip__________

Please enclose $20 for individual; $30 for family (1 year membership)

Mail To: CCWA,  PO Box 81453, Corpus Christi, TX  78468

Annual memberships are from Jan. through Dec.  Members joining after Oct. are credited for the next year.


 
Used Gear: Classified ads are free to members, non-members:  $5.00
Please submit the ads by the 25th of the month.
Mail ads to: LooseClu@prodigy.net
95 Seatrend '8"10, 105 liter, 14 lbs., World Cup Race Board  great condition. Board comes with "14 Finworks race fin. Used in 14 to 30 mph conditions. Very (fast) and controllable. $330 OBO 
94 Seatrend 8' 6", 82 liter, 17 lbs., ATV/wave  great condition. Used in 20-40 mph conditions. $250 OBO  Finworks Wave Fins various sizes. 
'95 Neil Pryde VX Race sail 5.8 meter  great condition $130 OBO.   All gear can be seen at Cline Street Sailboards. call Tony Mobil 512-784-3668, Work 512-342-2776
For more web classifieds, check out the Windsurfing Classifieds at "the other CCWA".

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