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CCWA CURRENTS Nov. 2001
What follows is an edited version of our newsletter "CURRENTS".  To get the full printed version, just join the club using the membership form below, and get the complete newsletter delivered to your mailbox every month.  Send submissions to the newsletter to LooseClu@prodigy.net. Windsurfer

Commodore's Notes:  Break Out The Shorty, Summerís Over
     Well, the Autumn Sailing season is in full swing. October provided us with some great northerly winds. I enjoyed a few mornings out at Port Aransas sailing in the surf. The crowd of regulars was well represented and it was fun to share the morning with the other lucky sailors. Lucky means; having the ability to drop everything and get to Port A as early as possible. Local sailing lore says sailing the morning after a cold front passes is the best time. Those of you who sail the bay found that Poenisch Park does indeed have some of the best conditions. The wind builds some great ramps and the swell blows down the length of the bay.  Poenisch is a great place to watch the sailing. The action takes place close to shore so donít forget your chair. 
      Rose and John Williams sponsored the annual sailing session at their home. Those of you that missed the Aransas Triangle event missed out on one of the best dinners weíve had this year. Special thanks to Rose Williams for her hospitality. We had a chance to welcome a new family to the club. Hans and Annie Anderson brought their two children, some sailing gear and a great attitude out the Aransas Pass to spend the day with us. Jonathan Bright had the right stuff and consistently sailed the fastest. Not to be outdone, Dick Ward doggedly chased him around the bay. What a great sailing site the Williams have in their backyard.  It was a perfect way to end the first month of autumn.
     I spent last weekend out on the Laguna. Bird Island was the place to be on Saturday and Sunday. November delivered a perfect weekend to those that made it out to the national seashore. I passed through the basin on a fishing expedition early Saturday. My guests in the boat were really impressed with the multitude of windsurfers cruising past. We motored through the pack and were entertained by numerous speed freaks desperate for the chance to show off for the boating crowd. The next day, Sunday, I took my catamaran out to Bird and gave my guests rides as I chased windsurfers across the area. What impressed me the most was the variety of people that have started arriving in the area for the winter season. The place was packed with sailors. Most of the folks are here on vacation. This influx of Winter Sailors may be heralding an epic Cold Weather season ahead.
    But then, how cold does it really get in South Texas? Will I finally break down and purchase a 3/2 full suit? Not if I donít have to! See you on the water.      Chip 

Greetings:  Last time we spoke of Thumps and Boings  by  Guy Racette
     As time passes the goal is to reduce the number and harshness of the THUMPS. This is probably the biggest difference between a yahoo like myself and a pro sailor.  Concentration and the ability to read, then correctly and accurately respond to the wave forms in front of the board create the biggest gap between sailors of differing ability levels.  Skiers do this all the time.  They pick your least bumpy path from among a set of choices, and then maneuver the body to set the skis accurately on the chosen path.  One important difference is that the moguls on a ski slope seldom move. Or try to roll over and grab your legs. 
     Every time a sailor misjudges the water ahead, the board smacks the water harder than it needed to.  This wets out more of the rocker (slow) distorts the sail shape a little more (slow), disrupts the sailorís position and forces him/her to sheet out a little to keep control. (also slow)  Sometimes it even causes a quick trip around the mast! (VERY slow) 
     The way to avoid some of this is to develop foot-steering skills.  This can be practiced very well on flat water, actually.  Pretend those little wavelets of chop are big enough to eat your lunch.  Keeping in mind that bigger waves move faster, you can still get the idea of how to keep your ride as smooth as possible by steering always for the most gradual slopes in front of the board. 
     Big whitecap dead ahead?  Quickly decide whether to head up a little more or to head off the wind a little more to duck it.  The consequences of either decision quickly become apparent.  Heading off requires unweighting the front foot and is scarier, but sometimes itís the better choice.  Youíll pick up some speed, but the rate of rise up the face of the swell will be gentler and the board will tend to stay flatter as it comes off the lip. Then youíll be able to turn that momentum quickly upwind after you land.
     When faced with steep chop, itís often easier to step hard on the windward rail and head up quickly.  This will slow the board speed a bit, but make the angle of rise up the face steeper, meaning you may fly higher. When you come down, the board may lose still more speed and it can take a while to get it back.  In other words, itís not always wrong to duck upwind, but remember the other choice is there if youíve practiced heading off quickly.  Whenever you try to make quick direction changes, beware the possibility of Killer Spinout.  Youíll learn just how hard you can push before the fin breaks loose and thatís another good thing to practice.         Biff 

Editor's Puffs:   by Roy Tansill
     Iíve always been slower than most folks and I guess its taken me a bit longer to accept the significance of recent US history.  Rather depressing stuff and I find that depression is to writing what no wind is to windsurfing- you just canít do it!
Iím not the only one.  Chip Biery, our Commodore and normally hyper energetic nice guy,  seemed to be equally afflicted when it came to writing.  I missed my second club meeting in 5 years last month and was not alone- almost everyone was a no show.  I offer no solution to these observations beyond saying it will be good to see you at the next meeting.  Iím going to be there- its therapeutic. 
     Taking the easy way out this month,  if a picture is worth a thousand words,  hereís a thousand that donít have to be written.  Despite his lone status (for now) rumor has it that there is a behind the scenes effort to incorporate unicycsailors into Unicycsailorthe CCWA.  As usual, Iím opposed to this change on the grounds that we canít get insurance coverage (and I canít ride one of those contraptions either!).
     With Thanksgiving rapidly nearing on the calendar, I was disappointed to hear that Worldwinds was not even going to be open this year for the holiday.  Iíve gotten quite attached to enjoying my turkey feast on the beach with a bunch of boardheads and the prospect of not having that option didnít improve my mood one bit.  Then came the word that the Dallas based North Texas Wind Riders were planning their annual Fall trek to Bird with or without Worldwinds.  Brian Cunningham (AKA the Dog) will be frying up turkeys on the beach and has opened the door to other sailors who might want to join in the feast.  Its a pot luck feast so the price of admission is bring something tasty to share with the hungry horde.  It might also be a good idea to let me know if you plan to attend and Iíll pass that along to the NTWR folks.  Theyíll be out at Bird that entire week so if youíd like to attend their party, drop by Bird during the week before and see what you can bring along to help out.  One item I know that is high on their list of needs is tables.
     Remember a few years ago, well I guess its been more than a decade now, when a boat with a secret keel ended the US domination of the Americaís cup?   That idea never filtered down to sailboards- until recently.  The sailboard version was winged findesigned for fins and it really isnít a winged fin; that design would grab weeds so badly it would be an anchor within a few yards.   This Ďwingedí fin uses an enlarged tip that is shaped like the fin foil but with much more chord width way down near the tip.  The photo is a prototype which was hand shaped out of wood and used a TruAmes Weed Blade as a base.  The reviews of folks who tried it were all very positive.  The fin generates lift- tons of it when its deepest point is somewhat bulbous.  The whole point of the ever increasing length of todayís fins is lift- this idea seems to produce that without something akin to a Samurai sword lurking under your board.  The Hawaii based tester raved about the fins upwind ability.  There is a major  drawback- no way to mold that design.  But with epoxy, some wood, sandpaper and too much spare time this looks like a fix for that now near useless formerly favorite Laguna Madre ground off tip weed fin that you have but never use anymore. 

Sightings   by someone else 
     Has anyone noticed that the wider the board Doc Allen has been ripping about on, the thinner he gets?  Rumor has it that its no illusion- Docís been getting into shape, sailing a lot, and also has been very hard to catch since heís gone both wider (board) and narrower (body) at the same time.
     Worldwinds has recently made a major change.  After dealing with Bic for many years, they are now an F2 stocked rental facility.  They also have gotten into the wide style so if you want to check out what a formula board can do for you,  go out to Bird and test drive one.  Its a lot cheaper to rent one before you pay out big bucks for one of your own.... first discover if they are or arenít your cup of tea. 
     While on the topic of width, Iíve observed that each issue of Windsurfing Magazine is thinner than its predecessor?  Iím uncertain what that indicates other than,  after scanning the next issue cover to cover, Iíll have more free time to do something else. 
     Since earlier this year Iíve been using iwindsurf.com as the source of the peak wind data in Doc Allenís monthly add.  This past month their Laguna Shores anemometer has been down more often than its been up.  That wind meter is on CCWA member Wally Allenís house off Laguna shores road.  The site is also home to Vicki and Bob Haraghyís Texas Excursions.  The problem began with the thunder storms we had back in September and had progressed to the point that the site was not reporting at all by the end of October.  A new PC was installed and the site is once again back online.  If youíve never used their service, give them a try- you can get a free trial month and theyíve got a good product. Give them a look at www.iwindsurf.com 
     We need some help for the upcoming Holiday Party.  If you want to help out, give Chip Biery a call.  So far we have a date but nothing else is confirmed; meanwhile,  December looms quite large on the rapidly nearing horizon.  We need a few folks for the party committee so how about you? 

2001 Aransas Triangle   by  Roy Tansill 
     Saturday, October 27th arrived clear and just cool enough to feel good.  A leisurely drive up to Aransas Pass then just a few miles further and I was once again at the waterfront home of John and Rose Williams in the City by the Sea Community.  This year felt different and unlike the past four years that Iíve made that same trip in late October. One major difference was immediately noticeable- John Williams was not there this year.   John was called out of the country for an unscheduled trip.  That left Rose to deal with the crew of Gumbo seeking windsurfers by herself.  The weather was great except there was no surplus of wind and by the time the race got underway there were only two racers who could get on a plane. 
     Jonathan  Bright brought his Starboard 175 potato chip along with a 9.0 sail and had little problem with the flat water out and back course.  Dick Ward tried to offer him competition but his vintage HyperTech air filled board couldnít match the big rig and wide platform his sole competitor was on.  The closest anyone came to the Lost at Sea Award was our commodore.  Chip provided the chase boat and coming out of the boat launch (only a block or two from our launch) he missed the channel thereby winding up out in Aransas Bay in a boat not really suited for the bayís wave action.  In dying northeast breeze the Bay had built up large ramps from earlier in the day and Chip was quite happy to find his way back into the flat water on the inside of the sand shoals. 
     Since the annual event has moved to the Williamsí home, the race has become secondary to the post race chow.   Gumbo consumers far out numbered sailors this year but a few hours on the water had me ready to consume multiple bowls of Roseís delicious concoction. 
     Maybe it was the Osama syndrome or perhaps everyone went to Port A for what was probably a great dawn patrol session in the waves but less than two dozen folks showed up for the 2001 Aransas Triangle.  Whatever your reasons for not attending, you missed a good time and the best gumbo west of New Orleans.  New family members, Hans and Annie Anderson,  were able to find their way there and it was good to see Jon Bright at a club function again.  The great fall weather held all the way through the late eveningí sky show.  For you folks who live amongst the cityís lights, the shoreline star/moon light show is another reason not to miss the next event John and Rose host.   Meanwhile Iíd like to offer my personal thanks to all of the no shows- I wolfed down a whole lot of that gumbo that could have been yours.

Bird's Eye View:
Wind Peaks
 Aug., Sep., & Oct. '01 
     Just got our Neil Pryde semi-drysuits back from the semi-dry cleaners, insulated all the water pipes out at the Worldwinds Command and Control Executive Office Container, changed the spark plug in the snow blower, and unpacked the brand new F2 188 formula boards.  These new 150 cm wide ďIcebreakerĒ models are amazing.  A tad bit of mast base pressure applies about 100,000 ft/lbs to the Kevlar/titanium reinforced nose and they can effortlessly break through 2 feet of ice while planing in 6 knots of wind.  For the first time in recent memory, we will be able to keep the sea-lanes open all the way down to Brownsville.  We are ready.
     So where is winter?  The wimpy cold front we got yesterday hardly counts. Daytime temperatures plunged to the mid- eighties and the water was not far behind. By noon everyone had peeled off the shorties and plastered on the sunscreen.  It was just another sunny summer day at the beach with lots of sails on the water. 
     The RV windsurfing gang has returned.  I mentioned them in a newsletter last spring and their presence here should really be no cause for alarm.  Unless provoked, they are usually pretty docile - kind of like our killer bee swarm on Labor Day.     Bill Horton is looking quite dapper in his straw fez, the weekend crowd continues to arrive - you guessed it, every weekend, fall vacation travelers are getting cheapo air fares and planning last minute trips, and the North Texas Windriders will be here this month along with  ďThe DogĒ frying up turkeys on Thanksgiving.  DARN THE TORPEDOES, we are all doing our patriotic duty and will milk this weather for as long as we can.  If you are one of the unlucky few who mis-calculated that the sailing season is over, it is not too late to change your ways.  Come on down to Bird, bring your sunscreen, and join the crowd. 
      SPEAKING OF WIDE BOARDS, WORLDWINDS WILL LEAD THE INDUSTRY: Thatís right folks; Worldwinds plans to be on the leading edge of the wide board revolution.  This winter we will be constructing ďMarina Muy GordoĒ, the first full-service wide board marina that our contractor assures us will be completed by the 2002 season.  There will be slips for up to 100 formula boards with the slip fee being determined by width.  Liveaboards will be charged a nominal additional charge for water and electricity.  Our haul out facility will have a travel lift capable of lifting up to 300cm wide, and the full service yard will do professional maintenance including bottom jobs and canvas work.  To accommodate anticipated fin lengths, a channel with a 9-foot operating depth will be maintained from the marina turning basin out to the Intracoastal Waterway. Marina Muy Gordo will be the first and only wide board marina in South Texas with Gulf of Mexico access.  The only obstacle is the JFK causeway bridge, with itís overhead clearance of 65 feet.  I have been assured that the new sails will easily clear this height, except in very light conditions. 
     Oh, I almost forgot to mention that we are also selling time-shares in the project, so if any of you out there are interestedÖ
NOVEMBER SCHEDULE:  CLOSED MONDAY/OTHER DAYS OPEN  11AM-5PM
CLOSED ON THANKSGIVING DAY 

       END OF SEASON SPECIALS: 
Dakine High Back waist harness XS-XL w/bar  $69.00 (reg $82) 
Dyna Fiber 430/25 masts $199 (reg $245)
Chinook In Flight harness lines $24 (reg $31) 
Chinook giant slalom boom 6í-8í $110  (reg  $166)
ALL OTHER RETAIL ITEMS   15% OFF 
Two or three brand new Gaastra sails for 25% off retail
Come on down and take advantage of the great weather, great sailing, great people, and great deals. 
Thatís it from here, Don 


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WHATABURGER  2001   THE SERIES
See you next season.
Volunteers Wanted:  The club sponsored events, both races and fun events, need people to help out on and before the events.  This is particularly true for the US Open.  One year, the CCWA was a sponsor and had a booth at the Open; but we didn't have sufficient help to man the booth throughout the event.  We don't want that to happen again!  Similarly, other events suffered because of a lack of help.  How about volunteering your help this year?  Just phone an event coordinator and offer some help.
Corpus Christi Windsurfing Association Membership Application

Name:______________________________________Phone: (       )______________

Family membership, list names of family members:_____________________________________

____________________________________E-mail Add:_________________________

Address:_______________________________________________________________

City:_________________________________State:_________________Zip__________

Please enclose $20 for individual; $30 for family (1 year membership)

Mail To: CCWA,  PO Box 81453, Corpus Christi, TX  78468
Annual memberships are from Jan. through Dec.  Members Joining after Oct. are credited for the next year.


 
Used Gear: Classified ads are free to members, non-members:  $5.00
Please submit the ads by the 25th of the month.
Mail ads to: LooseClu@prodigy.net
Pro-Tech Z-29:  Current, competitive or just way fun. Wide enough to take big sails, narrow enough to work with weed fins.  $550.
Berky Custom:  9'2" Slalom.  Works with 7.5 or smaller.$350.
F2 Thommen 275: Enough said.  Fast with 6.0 or smaller.$250.
Gaastra Nitro:  7.0, 5.9, other sizes may become available soon.  May be able to supply matched rig.  Sails alone $200.  Rig $500. 
Contact: Guy at racetteguy@msn.com

Worldwinds end of the year Ďgotta make room for the new wide stuffí sale
Bic Evolution Medium 112L - one left
Bic Saxo 270  95L - one left
Bic Techno 273 125L - two left
Four or five 2001 Gaastra sails of various sizes  $159 - 299
Contact Don at (361) 949-7472  e-mail djackson@worldwinds.net

Ď00 Seatrend 260 ATV  excellent condition custom 85L carbon reinforced jump & bump board w/ fin and daybag.  $500 obo 
Ď93 Brand-X slalom board 9í 100L knockoff of Copello w/Tuttle box, pads & good straps $75 
Contact Roy Tansill   e-mail: LooseClu@prodigy.net

For more web classifieds, check out the Windsurfing Classifieds at "the other CCWA".

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